All Saint’s Day

GorT works 20-25 miles away from home and as today is a Holy Day of Obligation for Catholics, I surfed around on MassTimes.org and found a couple local parishes that had mid-day Masses.  I chose one and arrived 5 minutes before Mass began.

I had never been to this parish but I found it welcoming and the priest who said Mass was excellent.  He kept it short likely in deference to those of us attending in the middle of the work day on our lunch breaks.  His homily, brief as it was, was well thought out and delivered a simple message: athletes, artists, and regular day-to-day workers practice their trades to improve it as we should with our spiritual lives.  In his terms, “practice to make it permanent”.  He wove that into the gospel reading of the beatitudes (Matthew 5:1-12a) which was read today.  While I appreciated his homily and the focus on practicing our lives as Catholics to make it permanent (live as Christ, make it to heaven, etc.), GorT took notice of a subpoint in the priest’s homily.  As he was discussing the beatitudes, he outlined them as follows (a paraphrase, but the sentiment is captured):

  • Blessed are the poor in spirit – God is there to fill that void as no one else can and carry them.
  • Blessed are they who mourn – God is with them to console them for no one else can.
  • Blessed are the meek – God is there to help them as otherwise they would be crushed.

Father’s point was that when we, as followers of Christ, address these needs we are practicing our faith and acting as Christ.

And my post could end here simply as a poignant reflection on the Solemnity of All Saints Day but there is another point to reflect upon.  While I hesitate to mix such a religious and reflective moment with politics, I will do so trepidatiously.  We are called, individually through this gospel (and others), to address these concerns.  It should be noted that it doesn’t say that government (Caesar?) should help the meek, mournful or humble.  It doesn’t call for any organization religious or secular to do so – God calls us individually to do so.  So while it is the Christian thing to help the poor, care for the sick and elderly, and feed the hungry, it doesn’t mean that we should shrug off our personal calling in lieu of hoping and voting in such a way that the federal, state, or local government will do that for us.

About GorT

GorT is an eight-foot-tall robot from the 51ˢᵗ Century who routinely time-travels to steal expensive technology from the future and return it to the past for retroinvention. The profits from this pay all the Gormogons’ bills, including subsidizing this website. Some of the products he has introduced from the future include oven mitts, the Guinness widget, Oxy-Clean, and Dr. Pepper. Due to his immense cybernetic brain, GorT is able to produce a post in 0.023 seconds and research it in even less time. Only ’Puter spends less time on research. GorT speaks entirely in zeros and ones, but occasionally throws in a ڭ to annoy the Volgi. He is a massive proponent of science, technology, and energy development, and enjoys nothing more than taking the Czar’s more interesting scientific theories, going into the past, publishing them as his own, and then returning to take credit for them. He is the only Gormogon who is capable of doing math. Possessed of incredible strength, he understands the awesome responsibility that follows and only uses it to hurt people.

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